Crystal Renn: Twilight of the plus-size goddess

For several years she was an icon of plus-size models. Now that even a few agencies of “bigger” models have sprung up, Crystal Renn has lost so much weight that she is suspected of having a relapse of the disease she suffered from in the past. Anorexia.

Crystal Renn, 26, who until recently was the most recognizable plus-size model, began her modeling career when she was still a teenager.

“It all started when I was 14 years old. At the school I went to, I was told I was going to be the next supermodel. So I immediately started losing weight. I could exercise for eight hours, almost every day. I ate lettuce, vegetables – that was my diet for almost three years. I finally got to the point where I was so weak that even walking came with difficulty,” – She said in an interview with “Vogue” magazine.

Kilograms of happiness

Crystal battled anorexia for the next few years without giving up her modelling career.

“Anorexia was real mental torture for me – that’s what it was. Of course, I had a slim body, the scale showed 95 pounds (about 44 kg – ed.). (. ) I remember looking in the mirror but not seeing who I really was. I touched my ribs, counted the veins on my arms (. ) – that was all that mattered to me (. ). I was sad, I hated myself (. ). Over time, my body changed, got bigger – as I got healthier. I knew that those extra pounds were synonymous with health. They were a joy to me.” – Renn recounted in a video made for the Let’s Talk About It: A Project of NOW Foundation’s Love Your Body Campaign to fight anorexia.

Watch the full video here:

After winning her battle with the disease, Renn gained weight to a size 46 and began appearing in fashion shows as a plus-size model. In 2006, she was invited by Jean-Paul Gaultier himself, who ended his spring/summer show by walking down the catwalk hand in hand with Crystal.

Prestigious magazines wrote about the curvy model: she appeared on the cover of “Harper’s Bazaar”, was mentioned in “Vogue”, “Vanity Fair” and “Glamour”. On the wave of her popularity, in 2009 Renn published the book “Hungry”. (Hungry), which hit the bestseller list.

In the spring of 2010, Crystal told an ETalk TV reporter: “The most important thing is to be yourself. When I realized that, I finally succeeded. It’s been a long and difficult journey, but I am now confident and happy just the way I am.”

Since then, Renn, the world’s most famous plus-size model, has gradually started to return to the mythical size “0” and become an ex-plus-size model. She first showed off her slimmer figure in late 2010.

Renn’s agent, Gary Dakin, in an email sent to ABCNews.com, wrote at the time that “Crystal started exercising again because she felt she was ready for it. Yoga and mountain hiking have become part of her life. (Crystal) is healthy and feels great.”

The effects of the workout were on display in early 2012 when Sports Illustrated magazine invited Crystal to be a contributor. There was no longer a trace of her famous curves, but Renn still did not resemble the emaciated model she was when she struggled with the disease.

Check out the model during her shoot for SI:

A few days ago, Renn appeared at a charity gala in New York City, and a video promoting Crystal’s latest photo shoot shot by Paul Rowland has hit the web. In the photos, the model has sunken cheeks and an emaciated figure.

Check out the trailer for the shoot:

A post by an anonymous user can be read under one of the videos of the “new” Renn posted online:

“It’s ridiculous that women have to try so hard to accept their bodies. This society is pretty fucked up about a lot of things, including this one. This whole Hollywood and fashion industry is completely brainwashing women, they show unnaturally skinny models and then women find their figures unattractive. It really is pathetic that this industry is responsible for so much mental and health damage. It’s really sick.”

Renn’s appearance has sparked quite a bit of controversy. There have been many articles online suggesting that Crystal Renn is battling anorexia again. Renn herself continues to deny it, claiming that her former problems have not returned. She made a statement on the blog of the modeling agency Ford, with which she is associated, in which she confesses that she “feels pressure from the media and the public” who have “given her the title of plus-size model” and are telling her eating disorder.

Like this post? Please share to your friends:
Mobile Pedia